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Platform/non - clip in pedal suggestions


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#1 Craig

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Posted 25 February 2019 - 10:13 AM

A recent "issue" means I won't be able to use clipless pedals for (at least) the next few months, so I wanted to ask our fellow GORCsters what has been holding up for you.

 

Since I like to pedal through corners, I'm thinking a thinner profile may be the idea to look at.  Obviously, there are many variations on that theme.  If it helps, I would rather get a more expensive pair of pedals that give me years of trouble free service than spend $40 on something that will be worn out in December.

 

Please discuss.

 

Thanks!


Craig Seibert, GORC Board Member

GORC/St. Charles County Parks Liaison


#2 zzzbullseye

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Posted 25 February 2019 - 01:56 PM

I don't have a ton of experience with flats, but my son used Race Face Chesters for a while before going clipless, they worked well and are affordable.  Composite body with sealed cro-mo axle and serviceable bearings should provide durability/longevity.



#3 Muddy tires

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Posted 25 February 2019 - 05:46 PM

I wear a size 14 and have ~400 trouble free miles on some One Up composites. If I wanted to go thinner and metal crank brothers stamp 7 in size large would be at the top of my list.

#4 estoys

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Posted 26 February 2019 - 10:31 AM

I rode clipless(Time ATAC) for about 17 years.  A couple years ago I thought it would be a fun challenge to go to platform pedals.  I started with Race Face Chesters and 510 Freerider shoes based on a lot of research.  The Chesters were fine for a trial pedal to see if I liked it.  After about a month I was hooked.  After more research I went with DMR Vaults.  I now have them on two bikes - my Stumpjumper and my Hardtail.  The Chesters were in the $50 range and the Vaults are in the $100 range.  The Vaults work better I think just because they have more pins.  They are built out of pretty sturdy metal and got bashed a lot in Fruita slickrock and Rhode Island granite, so they definitely hold up.  I honestly think more credit should go to shoe choice than pedals.  The 510s just stick like crazy to the pins.

 

My one bit of advice if you haven't rode drops, bunnhops etc. on flats in a while comes from a Ryan Leech course.  You imagine picking up a bowl from the inside with your flat hands you have to gently push outward.  The pedals/pins/shoes work this way.  Front foot heel down just a tad and rear foot toe down just a tad the friction between the two keeps the bike with you in the air.  That made all the difference for me when I converted.  For what it is worth, I decided to stay with flats after my experiment because my knees felt better.  

 

Hope this helps,

Brad


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#5 Craig

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Posted 04 March 2019 - 08:56 PM

I rode clipless(Time ATAC) for about 17 years.  A couple years ago I thought it would be a fun challenge to go to platform pedals.  I started with Race Face Chesters and 510 Freerider shoes based on a lot of research.  The Chesters were fine for a trial pedal to see if I liked it.  After about a month I was hooked.  After more research I went with DMR Vaults.  I now have them on two bikes - my Stumpjumper and my Hardtail.  The Chesters were in the $50 range and the Vaults are in the $100 range.  The Vaults work better I think just because they have more pins.  They are built out of pretty sturdy metal and got bashed a lot in Fruita slickrock and Rhode Island granite, so they definitely hold up.  I honestly think more credit should go to shoe choice than pedals.  The 510s just stick like crazy to the pins.

 

My one bit of advice if you haven't rode drops, bunnhops etc. on flats in a while comes from a Ryan Leech course.  You imagine picking up a bowl from the inside with your flat hands you have to gently push outward.  The pedals/pins/shoes work this way.  Front foot heel down just a tad and rear foot toe down just a tad the friction between the two keeps the bike with you in the air.  That made all the difference for me when I converted.  For what it is worth, I decided to stay with flats after my experiment because my knees felt better.  

 

Hope this helps,

Brad

 

Sir,

 

EXCELLENT advice, and much appreciated.

 

I chose to limit the discussion the way I did, and it sounds like I may have missed some info from people who had worthy opinions.  Noted for the future ...

 

FWIW, I started racing (bmx) bikes back when Evel Knievel was cool, and learned a HUGE amount of what I know about riding off road before clipless pedals were a fantasy.  Learned a TON riding that way, and my girlfriend now rides flats only while playing around off road (a couple classes w/Jay @ http://www.rootsmountainbiking.com/ helped).


Craig Seibert, GORC Board Member

GORC/St. Charles County Parks Liaison


#6 bulldog

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Posted 07 March 2019 - 01:23 AM

I have a pr. of Crank Brothers double shots I rode with two or thee times. Just didn't like them $20. if you want them. I switched to flats on five of my bikes using different brands, all of them work okay.


Downhills are fun! Uphills keep you young!

#7 autobon7

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 01:09 PM

Crank Brothers 50/50 3s are rebuildable like most better pedals. Super strong, pin height is adjustable, and fairly light weight. Have a couple pairs with a lot of time on them..... still look great.




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