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#1 TwentyMiles

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 07:31 PM

I am new to the sport. I decided to purchase a 29" Cannondale hard tail as my first bike. The bike came with tubed WTB Ranger 2.25 tires. I have adjusted air pressure etc. The problems I have are uphill traction over roots etc., and overall roughness on rocky terrain. Frankly, I get beat up on some trails. My question is: is it worth going to a larger tubeless tire? Or, should I just stick with the current tires until I upgrade the entire bike (I plan on going to a full suspension bike in the next year). Any advice is appreciated, including brands and models. I have been looking at Maxxis minions. Thanks

#2 lirch

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 08:39 PM

Simply going tubeless with the wheel/tire setup you have will be an improvement. If your current wheel/tire setup will allow. Larger tires will be an even further improvement both in traction (tire choice depending) and cushiness. The question is, how much are you willing to fork out for those added benefits? A set of tires can easily run you upwards of $100. Add in sealant (and possibly tubeless tape) and labor charges if you don’t work on your own bike, and you could be lookin at a close to $200 bill. If you can stretch that possible $200 setup til next year when you acquire said full suspension, I personally think it’s worth it. Hopefully you don’t get a 1”-2” gash in the sidewall of those nice new Maxxis tires you’re lookin at on the first ride though.

#3 TwentyMiles

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 08:58 PM

Simply going tubeless with the wheel/tire setup you have will be an improvement. If your current wheel/tire setup will allow. Larger tires will be an even further improvement both in traction (tire choice depending) and cushiness. The question is, how much are you willing to fork out for those added benefits? A set of tires can easily run you upwards of $100. Add in sealant (and possibly tubeless tape) and labor charges if you don’t work on your own bike, and you could be lookin at a close to $200 bill. If you can stretch that possible $200 setup til next year when you acquire said full suspension, I personally think it’s worth it. Hopefully you don’t get a 1”-2” gash in the sidewall of those nice new Maxxis tires you’re lookin at on the first ride though.

Thanks for the advice. I was hoping for the gash in the current tires to force the need for new ones. I hate to replace stuff prematurely, but I also dislike the rough ride.

Another question, how low can I go on current setup? The tire says 35 pounds, I am trying going down to 30, but don't want to damage the wheels.

#4 Eazy_E

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Posted 10 October 2019 - 10:53 AM

What you weigh will determine how low you can go in PSI.  With inner tubes, going too low in PSI will make the tubes get pinched by the rims and go flat, snake bite, because that's what it looks like.  

 

Honestly, there's a lot of BS in the bike industry.  27.5, 27.5+, 29, 29+, boost, super boost, etc.  Two things that I can say with absolute confidence that aren't BS, is tubeless tires and dropper posts.  



#5 TwentyMiles

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Posted 10 October 2019 - 07:24 PM

Can I go tubeless with my current tires and wheels, just with tape and sealant?

#6 Muddy tires

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Posted 10 October 2019 - 08:56 PM

Probably. What kind of rims?

#7 TwentyMiles

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Posted 11 October 2019 - 04:36 AM

Rims are WTB SX19, 32h

#8 Craig

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Posted 11 October 2019 - 07:47 AM

If WTB sticks with the same nomenclature for their SX rims as they do their "i" series, you are probably best to stick with what you have, and keep saving for your upgraded bike.

 

WTB usually utilizes the "i" designation for their tubeless compatible rims [i23, i25; link @ https://www.wtb.com/...riant=275960880], with the number denoting the bead to bead rim width, in mm.  While you COULD run a tire wider than your current 2.25, the relatively narrow rim means you would have to add pressure to the tire to keep the it from wiggling/squirming under the rim, especially in high traction/side load situations. 

 

Not exactly what you are after. 

 

Additionally, you may get lucky, and be able to convert that wheel set to a tubeless set up.  Or, your tires may come off the side of the rim without much warning.

 

Maxxis has some of the most popular tires around here, but spend the extra $$ and get the ones with a EXO designation (most Maxxis off road models will offer this).  Those will have the tougher sidewall, which will help the tire live in the sharp, flinty rock we have in the midwest.

 

Lastly, many of today's hardtail frames don't have the room for anything much bigger than a 2.25 or 2.3 width tire.  Be aware of that before you buy another size tire.


Craig Seibert, GORC Board Member

GORC/St. Charles County Parks Liaison


#9 Eazy_E

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Posted 11 October 2019 - 07:48 AM

Do they have TCS written on them? TCS is what WTB calls their tubeless rim bead.

#10 TwentyMiles

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 12:56 PM

This is what it says.

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#11 lirch

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 07:21 PM

Doesn’t look promising. What’s the bike make/model/year?

#12 TwentyMiles

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 08:26 PM

2019 Cannondale Trail 6

I looked up the WTB tire and it says TCS.

#13 lirch

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:42 AM

The tires listed on the C’dale website say Ranger Comp. Fairly certain as is referenced in this thread here: https://www.reddit.c...ntent=post_body, that your tires are NOT tubeless compatible.

Fairly certain the same is true for the SX19 rims as referenced here: https://forums.mtbr....dy-1051702.html

You would’ve needed to purchase the Trail 5 to get the tubeless compatible rims.

#14 TwentyMiles

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 08:02 AM

This is the tire information I found.
https://www.wtb.com/products/ranger

#15 TwentyMiles

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 08:14 AM

WTB does a horrible job providing information. The rims are not tubeless compatible. I'm just going to deflate to 28 pounds today and keep riding. I regret not starting with the full suspension bike.

#16 zez

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 12:55 PM

You said you're new to mt biking and feel beat up on the trails. Could it just be that you're new to mt biking? It's not a very smooth activity.



#17 Eazy_E

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 01:15 PM

I don't think anybody could ever call an aluminum hardtail plush. With a budget fork and high psi tires, it's gonna be jarring.

It kinda sucks, but that's the way of the hobby for most people. Most people can't afford 10k for a high end Santa Cruz, and even buying a low end one doesn't make a lot of sense for a novice since you're gonna crash it a few times(probably seriously at least once or five times), you can't ride it to it's ability, and you don't even know if you're gonna stick with the hobby.

If OP isn't fat, 28 PSI should be okay as long as you're not plowing hard into square corners. Once you buy a full suspension, the Cannondale will be a good bike for riding around the neighborhood to keep sharp if there trails are too wet anyway.

#18 TwentyMiles

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 04:20 PM

All of the above, plus being in the 5 decade club. Everything "hurts" more now than 30 years ago. True, I wasn't sure how much I would enjoy mountain biking, so didn't start with a high priced bike. Paul at Big Shark told me, "enjoy this bike...you'll be back for a full suspension within a year"...and he was right. I've read that riding hardtail "teaches" techniques like choosing a line etc. I certainly have learned by wrecking multiple interesting times. I truly enjoy riding. With the hardtail/tire combination I have, limitations become evident and force me to reduce speed. One of the biggest benefits to the sport is the people I've met have all been great. Thanks for the advice.




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