Jump to content


Photo

Tire size


  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#21 lirch

lirch

    Advanced Contributor

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 392 posts

Posted 28 October 2019 - 09:22 PM

Bigger tires aren’t necessarily gonna give you that much of a difference unless your frame has clearance for a substantial jump which would likely require a smaller wheel size. They’re just going to be bigger tires that you almost have to max out in psi to make sure you don’t pinch flat.

When it slipped, were you trying to stand and climb by mashing on as big of a gear as you could handle or were you sitting and in your easiest gear trying to spin more with your weight back over the rear wheel and your chin toward the stem?

I ask, because you’ve said you’re fairly new to the sport and thought you might just need a few technique pointers. Also curious what size frame you got compared to your height and leg/torso length. Maybe consider a Roots MTB Clinic or brush up on some skills by watching some vids on Pinkbike or YouTube.

Otherwise, bigger tubed tires are not going to give you the same benefit as going tubeless. It’d basically be a sidestep whereas tubeless is a step forward. Bigger tires, setup tubeless? That’s two steps forward!
  • Craig likes this

#22 TwentyMiles

TwentyMiles

    Newbie

  • Forum Member
  • Pip
  • 23 posts

Posted 28 October 2019 - 09:56 PM

I'm 6 foot even and weigh 220. I have watched YouTube videos and taken the approach of building momentum prior to climbs, coming off the saddle and putting my chest over the handle bars. The bike I am using is really not designed for much beyond a green trail and I am riding blue/black trails. I really just need to get a new bike.

What I don't get on the bikes is if I go up one model level, all I gain is one additional rear gear, 2 millimeters thicker fork stantion, and everything else is the exactly same....and the bike is $250 more! The price to benefit has me lost

#23 lirch

lirch

    Advanced Contributor

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 392 posts

Posted 29 October 2019 - 12:59 AM

The technique you’re referencing is that of a racer or single speeder. Try staying seated while you climb to help keep your rear wheel planted, use your easiest gear (cause that’s what they’re there for), bring your chest closer to your top tube, and your chin closer to your bars/stem.

You try climbing like that on a full suspension and you’re likely going to have the same result.
  • Craig likes this

#24 Eazy_E

Eazy_E

    Newbie

  • Forum Member
  • Pip
  • 21 posts

Posted 29 October 2019 - 05:39 PM

If an extra $250 buys you a burlier fork, that's money well spent. A 200 plus pound man doesn't need to ride on 32mm stanchions. There, I said it. Updating later to a Pike, Yari, Revelation, Fox34/36, or something exotic like a DVO Diamond will be like $600 minimum to over a thousand. 12sp vs 11sp? That's for you to decide. The higher spec should come with better brakes too and that's a very worthwhile upgrade. I was nothing less than astounded the difference between XT icetech brakes and the Avids that came with the bike.

So overall, yeah, I'd say go for the higher spec. Or just plan to upgrade as things break.

#25 TwentyMiles

TwentyMiles

    Newbie

  • Forum Member
  • Pip
  • 23 posts

Posted 01 November 2019 - 08:00 PM

I rode Grotpeter todaThe technique you’re referencing is that of a racer or single speeder. Try staying seated while you climb to help keep your rear wheel planted, use your easiest gear (cause that’s what they’re there for), bring your chest closer to your top tube, and your chin closer to your bars/stem.

You try climbing like that on a full suspension and you’re likely going to have the same result.

I rode Grotpeter today and dodged many deer.  This worked well!  At first I had the front tire bouncing up on bigger roots.  Let 2 more pounds of air out and it was a great ride.  It felt much different than standing, but worked great and I powered up every climb.  Thank you for the advice.


  • lirch likes this

#26 falasi4

falasi4

    Advanced Contributor

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 389 posts

Posted 18 November 2019 - 12:02 PM

your mileage may vary but from a 50+ perspective (close to 200lbs)

 

In general I can get away with a lot less psi using tubes than a lot would think- likely my riding style (I float/unweight the bike a lot)

I also run a little bit (2oz or less) of stans inside the tubes which is something I started doing while frequenting trails in New Mexico with a lot of little thorns but has made pinch flats everywhere else a non-issue.

 

My hard tail 29r single speed ended up with a short travel suspension seat post.  I only ride it on fairly tame (Cliff Cave/SIUE) trails with 2.1" tires and 25psi is all I need.

 

My geared 29r has a better supsension seat post and longer travel fork and I get below 25psi with no issues - Schwalbe Racing Ralphs

 

Dualie 29r (Giant Anthem X) has 2.25 and typically running ~22psi with tubes - Schwalbe Knobby Nics



#27 estoys

estoys

    Newbie

  • Forum Member
  • Pip
  • 16 posts

Posted 27 November 2019 - 11:23 AM

I'm on board with Falasi4 above on this one.  If you work on floating over obstacles rather than bashing into them, you can get by with tubes.  I weigh between 180 and 200 based on season & ride a GTForce with 27.5 x 2.4®  2.6(F) Minions.  I run tubes in them and am normally at around 22psi.  This setup has been to Ocala, FL, Brevard, NC and Fruita,CO this year and I haven't flatted.  I have even bought the Gorilla tape and Orange Seal to do the tubeless conversion, but I never get around to it because it hasn't been a problem.

 

I had never thought of putting a little sealant in the tubes before.  I might try that.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users